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CURE has a comprehensive approach to providing surgical care for children with disabilities. We support their families and strengthen the capacity of local church and healthcare systems in the countries we serve.

CURE Children’s Hospitals

CURE International is a global nonprofit network of children’s hospitals providing surgical care in a compassionate, gospel-centered environment. Services are provided at no cost to families because of the generosity of donors and partners like you.

About CURE

Motivated by our Christian identity, CURE operates a global network of children’s hospitals that provides life-changing surgical care to children living with disabilities.

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CURE International is a global nonprofit network of children’s hospitals providing surgical care in a compassionate, gospel-centered environment. Services are provided at no cost to families because of the generosity of donors and partners like you.

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Orthopedic Surgery

Pin-track infection in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients with open fractures treated by external fixation

Abstract: Patients infected with HIV presenting with an open fracture of a long bone are difficult to manage. There is an unacceptably high rate of post-operative infection after internal fixation. There are no published data on the use of external fixation in such patients. We compared the rates of pin-track infection in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients presenting with an open fracture. There were 47 patients with 50 external fixators, 13 of whom were HIV-positive (15 fixators).

There were significantly more pin-track infections requiring pharmaceutical or surgical intervention (Checketts grade 2 or greater) in the HIV-positive group (t-test, p = 0.001). The overall rate of severe pin-track infection in the HIV-positive patients requiring removal of the external-fixator pins was 7%. This contrasts with other published data which have shown higher rates of wound infection if open fractures are treated by internal fixation.

Publication: The Journal of Joint and Bone Surgery
Publication Year: 2007
Authors: Norrish, A. R., Lewis, C. P., Harrison, W. J.
Tags
AIDS
external fixation
HIV
infection
internal fixation
LMIC
post-operative