Skip to content

What We Do

CURE has a comprehensive approach to providing surgical care for children with disabilities. We support their families and strengthen the capacity of local church and healthcare systems in the countries we serve.

CURE Children’s Hospitals

CURE International is a global nonprofit network of children’s hospitals providing surgical care in a compassionate, gospel-centered environment. Services are provided at no cost to families because of the generosity of donors and partners like you.

About CURE

Motivated by our Christian identity, CURE operates a global network of children’s hospitals that provides life-changing surgical care to children living with disabilities.

CURE Overview

CURE International is a global nonprofit network of children’s hospitals providing surgical care in a compassionate, gospel-centered environment. Services are provided at no cost to families because of the generosity of donors and partners like you.

Overview

Take Action

Give, serve, and help kids heal with CURE.

Sponsor a Surgery

Provide life-changing surgical and ministry care.

Learn More

 

Neurosurgery

Pediatric hydrocephalus in East Africa: prevalence, causes, treatments, and strategies for the future

Abstract: The burden of infant hydrocephalus in East Africa is significant, with more than 6000 new cases estimated per year. The majority is caused by neonatal infection, and should thus be preventable. With about 1 neurosurgeon per 10,000,000 people in East Africa, initial treatment for hydrocephalus is often unavailable. This also renders shunt dependence more dangerous in East Africa than in the developed world. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy combined with choroid plexus cauterization (ETV/CPC) has proven effective in avoiding shunt dependence in the majority of infants. Unlike shunts, most failures of endoscopic treatment are evident in the early months after surgery, with later failures being rare. Easily accessible clinical parameters can be used to predict the likelihood of success in a given patient.

There appears to be no developmental advantage to shunt dependence compared to treatment by ETV/CPC. Cooperative efforts such as the East African Neurosurgical Research Collaboration are needed to broaden the scope of research and training needed to significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality of this disease.

Publication: World Neurosurgery
Publication Year: 2010
Authors: Warf, B. C., East African Neurosurgical Research Collaboration
Tags
hydrocephalus
LMICs
prevelence
training
treatment