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CURE has a comprehensive approach to providing surgical care for children with disabilities. We support their families and strengthen the capacity of local church and healthcare systems in the countries we serve.

CURE Children’s Hospitals

CURE International is a global nonprofit network of children’s hospitals providing surgical care in a compassionate, gospel-centered environment. Services are provided at no cost to families because of the generosity of donors and partners like you.

About CURE

Motivated by our Christian identity, CURE operates a global network of children’s hospitals that provides life-changing surgical care to children living with disabilities.

CURE Overview

CURE International is a global nonprofit network of children’s hospitals providing surgical care in a compassionate, gospel-centered environment. Services are provided at no cost to families because of the generosity of donors and partners like you.

Overview

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Orthopedic Surgery

Pattern of distribution of patients presenting with osteogenesis imperfecta at AIC Cure Children’s International Hospital, Kijabe

Abstract:

Objective: The study was carried out to determine the tribal and geographical distribution of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta in Kenya.

Design: This was a 14 year retrospective review study.

Setting: Cure Hospital, Kenya.

Materials and Methods: The medical charts of all patients admitted with  Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) over a period of 14 years [2000 to 2014] were reviewed.

Results: A total of 80 patients with osteogenesis imperfecta were seen. Fifty seven point five percent of the patients with OI were males and 42.5% were females. Thirty seven point five percent were of Kamba origin while 28.8% were from the Kikuyu tribe. Majority of these patients came from Eastern region of Kenya with 26.25% coming from Machakos and 30 out of the total of 80 patients were from Kamba tribe.

Conclusions: Most of these patients come from Eastern region of Kenya. Majority of patients with OI were of Kamba origin followed by the Kikuyu tribe. A larger epidemiological study needs to be carried out to more conclusively determine the relative prevalence and genetic patterns of osteogenesis imperfecta in Kenya.

Publication: East African Orthopaedic Journal
Publication Year: 2016
Authors: Mwangi, G. C., Macharia, J. T.
Tags
brittle bone disease
healthy systems strengthening
osteogenisis imperfecta