Research CURE Hydrocephalus setting a course for sustainability

CURE Hydrocephalus setting a course for sustainability

Abstract

In 2000, when Dr. Benjamin Warf left his position as chief of pediatric neurosurgery at the University of Kentucky to establish a hospital in Mbale, Uganda, no one expected a groundbreaking surgical procedure to be born. The standard treatment for hydrocephalus, known colloquially as water on the brain, was to insert a shunt into the ventricles of the brain to drain excess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). (See Exhibit 1 for description of hydrocephalus.) Working in a low-resource area with a limited supply of shunts and a high incidence of hydrocephalus, Warf pioneered an alternative, low-cost treatment which many came to accept as a more suitable intervention for children with acquired hydrocephalus.