Stories

Why won’t you help?

Newton, one of our CURE kids, saw this lady using a wheelchair. I am not sure what is happening, but we saw Newton, who has spina bifida, go over and help push her wheelchair.





I am not in a position to help. I don’t have extra. It’s not my responsibility. How can I help when I also need help? How will others look at me when they see me do it? I’m not in a position to help today; maybe another day. I will give when I have enough.

These are some of the reasons we give in our minds to vindicate ourselves when we have an opportunity to help those in need and we don’t. I do this. At times, I have felt inadequate. In other cases, it is simply too inconveniencing to my schedule or my resources. The past couple of days, I have come across a number of photos that I’ve taken while serving at CURE. They are photos of people whose “small” acts of kindness have challenged my attitude towards helping others and sharing with those in need.

These two girls came to one of our mobile clinics in Kisumu, Kenya. The lady in the wheelchair needed to move her chair. Her friend offered to help even though she herself has challenges walking. She helped while everybody else sat and watched.

These two girls came to one of our mobile clinics in Kisumu, Kenya. The lady in the wheelchair needed to move her chair. Her friend offered to help even though she herself has challenges walking. She helped while everybody else sat and watched.

These photos reminded me of Jesus’ parable of the Good Samaritan. In Luke 10:25, Jesus gives this parable as a response to a question He gets from the pharisees when He tells them to love their neighbors as they love themselves. From the parable, we meet three characters: the priest, the Levite, and the Samaritan. At some point in our lives, we have found ourselves in the position of any of these three characters. I imagine the priest and the Levite, like most of us, did a quick, logical arithmetic calculation in their heads that considered many factors: resources, public image, time, the law, and politics. Were it in the current age, they would probably consider how many likes posting a story on social media would get them, or they might take a quick picture of the crime scene and post. Anyway, all factors considered, they thought it wise to cross the road and mind their own business.

We did not learn this girl's name, but what she did struck us with awe. Her mother gave her a piece of scone to eat. It wasn’t a big piece. She took the first bite and there was a man in a wheelchair next to her who not eating anything. She shared the remainder of the scone with the man.

We did not learn this girl’s name, but what she did struck us with awe. Her mother gave her a piece of scone to eat. It wasn’t a big piece. She took the first bite and there was a man in a wheelchair next to her who not eating anything. She shared the remainder of the scone with the man.

The Samaritan, I imagine, thought the same, but love swayed his decision to go ahead and help the man. He did it despite the fact that his journey suffered a one-day delay. He helped even though it was not something he had on his itinerary. He had to divert his own resources to help this man.

Many times, we miss an opportunity to help because we are in a hurry, or our resources are too tight to be diverted to something else. We forget that, no matter what excuses we have, love should be our main motivation for helping others. More often than not, we forget the commandment that we ought to love our neighbors as we love ourselves.

Gibson has spina bifida and hydrocephalus. He can’t walk and has very limited function. Yet, he still helps to take care of his baby brother. In this photo, he had come for a follow up clinic, which sometimes have long queues. So, he was helping his mother hold his sleeping brother.

Gibson has spina bifida and hydrocephalus. He can’t walk and has very limited function. Yet, he still helps to take care of his baby brother. In this photo, he had come for a follow up clinic, which sometimes have long queues. So, he was helping his mother hold his sleeping brother.

From seeing a girl struggling to walk in order to help another who is in a wheelchair, and a two-year-old sharing what little she has, I realize that I never have an excuse to act like the priest or the Levite in the story. Love should always drive us to act like the Samaritan. We should help out of love, and not conveniences, adequacy of our resources, or to act superfluous, but always out of love.

Spending ourselves everyday for those in need because we know that it is not in vain. Galatians 6:9.

Newton, one of our CURE kids, saw this lady using a wheelchair. I am not sure what is happening, but we saw Newton, who has spina bifida, go over and help push her wheelchair.

Newton, one of our CURE kids, saw this lady using a wheelchair. I am not sure what is happening, but we saw Newton, who has spina bifida, go over and help push her wheelchair.