Jonathan and David

The Banda family: Jonathan, David, and their proud father.

Brothers Jonathan and David sharing a laugh outside of Beit CURE Hospital in Zambia. The boys now have a new sense of joy and confidence after their surgery at CURE.

Blood runs deep. There is an unseen connection between brothers. Even though you may not have similar interests, you still have a strong bond. But what if you not only grew up with someone with that blood connection, but you also shared something no one else you know shared: the same disability. One that was obvious to anyone who saw you. One that made you want to stay in your house and not go out.  One that your classmates made fun of you for.  One that, in your father’s own words, made you “laughingstocks” of the entire town.

This was Jonathan and David’s daily life.

One of the great joys of my job is not just that I make a living telling stories (which by nature I’m hard-wired to do), but within those stories I get to see chapters that not everyone else does. Sometimes, those “bonus” chapters are so good I need to go back and rewrite the entire novel.

This is what I did with Jonathan and David.

I first became aware of these two boys when my media intern extraordinaire, Stiv Twigg, sent me some videotape of their story from his time in Zambia. I immediately set to work making a video about them; they had such joy and charisma, and the father seemed so thankful. Stiv shot some great footage of them in their home doing an interview and outside their home doing karate and other fun boy stuff.

Jonathan and David with CURE Multimedia Producer and new found friend, Bryce Alan Flurie.

Jonathan counseling Boniface before his upcoming surgery.

When I was planning a shoot in Zambia, I really wanted to connect with these two guys. Pastor Harold from Zambia lined them up to come to the hospital for an interview. What a great time! We really connected. They even asked me to pose for a picture with them — after I climbed down an almost three story ladder on a water tower I had just been shooting from (but that is another story).

These boys and their father radiate joy and thankfulness. One of the most telling quotes is: “I tried; it won’t work!” This father tried everything until he just couldn’t try any more. No one could fix his son’s feet. No one, that is, until CURE. Now Jonathan wants to be a doctor, and David wants to be a pastor. And the gentle pastoral spirit these guys exude is as great a transformation as their now straightened feet. I have it on film (well, in pixels) — Jonathan counseling a boy named Boniface about his upcoming clubfoot surgery. Jonathan and David get it. They’ve been there. And they love helping people who used to be just like them.This is a perfect example of what CURE does. We heal broken bodies, and through that are able to change hearts.

Sometimes a story is even better the second time you tell it.  And honestly, I can’t wait for the sequel… Boniface’s surgery is complete. I think it would be great to get these three boys together again. I’ll make sure I tell you how it ends.

 


Photo of the Bryce Alan Flurie

About the Author:

Bryce Alan Flurie served at CURE from 2008 to 2017. Photographer, Videographer, Editor, Poet, and Multi-Instrumentalist, Bryce lives with his lovely wife and cherubic children on a farm in rural PA that has been in his family for four generations. His lens has found its way to Sarajevo, Palestine, Honduras, the Dominican Republic, the United Arab Emirates, Niger, Egypt, Kenya, Ethiopia, Malawi, Zambia, Uganda, Haiti, India, and the Philippines.

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